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Argentine farmer finds 20,000 year old Giant Armadillo family

blank - Argentine farmer finds 20,000 year old Giant Armadillo family

It’s not every day you discover an entire family of armadillos that has been buried for 20,000 years. But this is exactly what happened to the Argentine farmer who found this family of Giant Armadillo (Glyptodon) near a river. The scientist says these animals walked on their hind legs and used their front claws to dig holes in the ground.

They were related to modern armadillos, but much bigger! And they date back to the time when humans first started farming corn and other crops around 10,000 BC-before that people hunted game like mammoths and giant sloths with spears or threw rocks at them from afar.

 

The Giant Armadillo family was buried for 20,000 years. This large, prehistoric version of the modern armadillo once roamed South America and weighed up to a tonne. It would’ve lived alongside early humans (when Homo sapiens first appeared) and became extinct shortly after people started farming in South America around 10,000 BC.

Argentine farmer finds 20,000 year old Giant Armadillo family 1

These armadillos were related to modern armadillos (Tatu), but much bigger; they measured 10 feet (3 meters) long and weighed up to a tonne. They probably walked on their hind legs and used their front claws to dig holes in the ground like their smaller relatives. It’s believed this family of armadillos became extinct soon after people started farming in South America around 10,000 BC.

This discovery could help scientists better understand how ancient humans lived before agriculture became widespread in South America – a major turning point for early civilizations that altered the course of history forever. This is a great finding and I would not be surprised if more prehistoric creatures are found in this area.

The scientist says these animals walked on their hind legs and used their front claws to dig holes in the ground. They were related to modern armadillos, but much bigger!

And they date back to the time when humans first started farming corn and other crops around 10,000 BC-before that people hunted game-like mammoths and giant sloths with spears or threw rocks at them from afar. This discovery could help scientists better understand how ancient humans lived before agriculture became widespread in South America.

This discovery could help scientists better understand how ancient humans lived before agriculture became widespread in South America – a major turning point for early civilizations that altered the course of history forever.

This is a great finding and I would not be surprised if more prehistoric creatures are found in this area.

An armadillo is any of 21 species of placental mammals in the families of Chlamyphoridae, Dasypodidae, and Tolypeutidae. They are New World placental mammals. The Chlamyphoridae family includes arboreal (living in trees) armadillos, which live in South America. On the other hand, the Dasypodidae family includes nine-banded armadillos, which live in North America.

Armadillos are medium to small mammals with an average length of 60 cm (2 ft). They can weigh anywhere from 0.1 kg (2 lb.) to 14 kg (31 lb.), depending on the species. Armadillos have bony plates covering their dorsal (upper) side called osteoderms, which protect them from predators. The anatomy of the armadillo is similar to that of an ant or termite, with its head at the end of a pointed snout and four slender legs.

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